Probation

Probation following a NC DWI Conviction

Following a Raleigh DWI conviction, a Defendant may be placed on supervised on unsupervised probation. If the defendant has gotten an assessment, and can pay all of his court costs and fines on the day of conviction, then the defendant will in most cases be placed on unsupervised probation for Level 3, 4, or 5…

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Probation Violations and Revocations in North Carolina

Recent changes to North Carolina’s post-conviction laws change the authority of the judge to handle probationers who violate the terms of their probation. For all probation violations on or after December 1, 2011, the judge may only revoke for a new criminal offense or for absconding. The practice in many parts of the state is…

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Post Supervision Release and New Maximum Sentences

In light of recent changes to North Carolina’s post-supervision release and post-conviction laws, all offenses, except now have post supervision release. Everyone convicted of an offense committed on or after December 1, 2011 will be required to complete Post-Release Supervision. Class B1 to F have twelve months of post supervision release. Class F through I…

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Probation Violations and Changes to North Carolina’s Probation Laws

There are two types of probation – supervised or unsupervised – and within supervised probation, there are additional requirements that may be imposed, including intensive probation, drug conditions, “school conditions”, and so forth. This guide on Probation Violations from the UNC School of Government explains the basics of probation violations. If a person violates probation,…

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What is probation? What’s the difference between supervised and unsupervised probation?

Upon conviction for a misdemeanor or felony in most courts, including North Carolina’s state courts, the judge may have the discretion to impose a probationary sentence. Many people are confused about what probation is. In general, there are two forms of probation – supervised and unsupervised. (In North Carolina, and possibly other jurisdictions, there is…

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